Interactions between Quality of Life at Work and Family: Integrative Review

  • Rosana Maria Barreto Colichi Botucatu Medical School, Universidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp)
  • Silvia Cristina Mangini Bocchi Associate Professor at Botucatu Medical School, Universidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp), Brazil
  • Silvana Andrea Molina Lima Assistant Professor at Botucatu Medical School, Universidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp), Brazil
  • Regina Célia Popim RN, PhD, Associate Professor at Botucatu Medical School, Universidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp), Brazil

Abstract

Background: The family is one of the most important components of people's quality of work life (QWL). This study aims to identify the production of knowledge in national and international journals about the interactions between QWL and family relationships. Method: This is an integrative review of literature, carried out from 2011 to 2016, in the databases: Medline, LILACS, Index Psychology - scientific technical journals, BDENF-nursing, SciELO.ORG, CINAHL, EMBASE, SCOPUS, PubMed and Web of Science and PubMed. Full-text articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish were available for free in these databases. Results: The corpus of analysis consisted of 83 articles, where 95% of the researchers focused their studies on: a) concepts and dimensions; B) conflicts and balance; C) influence of work in the family; D) health; E) diagnosis; and F) enrichment. Conclusions: There was a lack of studies on the influence of the family and the family environment on work and the possible correlations of QWL and family functionality, denoting the need for future research on these two aspects, aiming to deepen understanding for the improvement of QWL Organizations.

Published
Jan 2, 2017
How to Cite
COLICHI, Rosana Maria Barreto et al. Interactions between Quality of Life at Work and Family: Integrative Review. International Archives of Medicine, [S.l.], v. 9, jan. 2017. ISSN 1755-7682. Available at: <http://imed.pub/ojs/index.php/iam/article/view/2126>. Date accessed: 14 nov. 2018. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3823/2229.
Section
Public Health and Health Management