The emergence of antimicrobial resistance in enterococci isolates from infants: A review study

  • Asem A. Shehabi The Jordan University, Amman
  • Emman F Badran
  • Nazha Ala’a Alnasra

Abstract

The emergence of antibiotic resistance in potential bacterial pathogens is considered as an important consequence of antibiotic misuse and overuse in humans and animals husbandry. In addition,  lacks of adequate infection-control practice in hospital and medical care settings have led to the continuing development of extensive resistance problems worldwide. Certain multidrug-resistant commensal and potential pathogens are now   widely spread in community and hospital patients worldwide . Examples are meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistance enterococcci (VRE), extended-spectrum β-lactamase- and carbapenemase-producing coliforms, and toxin-hyperproducing Clostridium difficile. During the last decade, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium are the most prevalent species cultured from human infections. Incidence of enterococci resistant to multiple antibiotics has become increasingly common in the hospitalized patients all over the world. E. faecium is reported to be responsible for most vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections.

 

Published
Apr 12, 2015
How to Cite
SHEHABI, Asem A.; BADRAN, Emman F; ALA’A ALNASRA, Nazha. The emergence of antimicrobial resistance in enterococci isolates from infants: A review study. The International Arabic Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, [S.l.], v. 4, n. 3, apr. 2015. ISSN 2174-9094. Available at: <http://imed.pub/ojs/index.php/IAJAA/article/view/1086>. Date accessed: 25 jan. 2021. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3823/757.
Section
Articles

Keywords

Enterococci resistance, VRE, Infants, Jordan